A LIVING HISTORY BLOG.

18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Tuesday, 25 January 2011

Dave's ACT, & more about why I don't find Australian Living History much fun!

A good blog and a good post.
http://www.davesact.com/2011/01/australia-day-2011.html#comment-form

5 comments:

Dave Reid said...

Thanks Keith. As far as 18th century living history goes in Australia... to be more authentic practitioners should perhaps acknowledge the truth of 18th century times in Australia and educate. That would be true living history perhaps...

Murphyfish said...

Cheers for the link Keith, another excellent blog to peruse.
Regards,
John

Le Loup said...

Good in theory Dave, but I for one would feel very uncomfortable were I a historical reenactor. I think also that the public in general would not like it. It is one thing to know, but it is another to have it shoved in your face!
But I do think that where Australian historical reenactments are taking place, there should be information and a pictorial display showing the other side.
Personally I would love to have some Aboriginal people in our group, but battle reenactments are not going to happen! Mind you we do not do public displays of any kind, so this is a personal thing. I think Having Aboriginal people in our group would add to the fun and our knowledge, whatever part they played.
There is still so much more to learn.

Bob Mc said...

That's about what I understand the early history of Australia to be like. It seems Europeans built up a record of domination and subjugation of native peoples wherever they went.

I'm just catching up on the blogs. Computer was sick and spent a few days in the hospital.

Ross said...

I think these days we fall into the opposite trap that writers of previous decades did. As a reactionary effort, we seek to reject everything that has so far been portrayed in a positive light. The truth is somewhere in between. Painting all European settlement efforts as some type of savage greed driven lust for plunder and murder, is just as unfounded as the earlier portrayal of the indigenous inhabitants.