A LIVING HISTORY BLOG.

18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Saturday, 26 May 2012

Woodland Indian Women.


“If a man who wishes his wife to be with him while he is out hunting in the woods, he needs only tell her that on such a day they will go to such a place where he will hunt for a length of time, and she will be sure to have provisions and everything else that is necessary in complete readiness, and well packed up to carry to the spot. The woman, therefore takes charge of the baggage, brings it to the place of encampment, and there immediately enters on the duties of housekeeping, as if they were at home. She moreover takes pains to dry as much meat as she can, that none may be lost; she carefully puts tallow up, assists in drying the skins, gathers in as much wild hemp as possible for the purpose of making strings, carrying-bands, bags and other necessary articles, collects roots for drying; in short, does everything in her power to leave no care to her husband but the important one of providing meat for the family.”

John Heckewelder 18th century.

2 comments:

Gorges Smythe said...

That last sentence puts a bit of perspective in the "lazy brave - overworked squaw" belief that some have.

Le Loup said...

I agree Gorges, you can't comment on this way of life until you have lived it.