A LIVING HISTORY BLOG.

18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Sunday, 24 October 2010

How To Make A Wira.

7 comments:

Dave Reid said...

Excellent film Keith! as you know I have a special interest in scarred trees which are Aboriginal remnants of the process the film depicts. I have only ever been able to find photos of the process before. I have added the video to my Scarred tree page on my blog.
Cheers.

Bob Mc said...

Always interesting to see how native peoples, the world over, did things before they had the white man's tools.

Gorges Smythe said...

Interesting - the patience of the maker, as well as the method. It would have been nice to see the "bowl" in actual use, too.

Le Loup said...

Hi Dave, yes I thought you would like it. I was going to post you the link, but decided that you would see it soon enough on here.
Keith.

Yes I agree Bob, and this project looks as though it was hard work without a steel hatchet.

Hi Gorges. Probably used in conjunction with a digging stick, especially when digging for honey ants.

grimbo said...

real bushcraft,thanks m8

Dave Reid said...

Just for general info: the "wira" or "coolomon" (vessel) was pretty much a standard item used in many parts of Australia. Around my area (canberra) the bark was removed without the need for excessive carving/gouging after the bark was removed.

The wira was used for many purposes such as to collect food (as Keith said in conjunction with a digging stick), carry items, and even cradle babies. Pretty much anything we would use varying sized bowls for.

Pretty well honed "bush" skills displayed really I think...

Le Loup said...

Grimbo, you are very welcome. YouTube gave me the "heads up" on this one and got it right for a change!

Dave,thanks for the extra info. You mean you think he has done this before!:)