A LIVING HISTORY BLOG.

18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Friday, 6 September 2013

One Blanket Winter Camping.

One Blanket Winter Camping.

It can get very cold here in New England NSW, but there are places where it can get much colder. So be mindful of the areas you camp in when applying my methods to your Historical Treks.
I only carry one wool blanket all year round. Rather than add the bulk & weight of extra blankets or furs, I prefer to rely on the warmth from a reflector fire built close to my open fronted shelter, and the use of extra clothing. In my blanket roll I carry a wool Monmouth cap, a wool waistcoat, and a woolen shirt. At night in winter I make sure that the clothes I have on are not damp from the day’s exertions, and then I put on these extra clothing items on top of the clothing I already wearing.


I also wear a half-blanket as a cape over my shoulders and pinned together at the front. This too is worn on cold nights, and if too warm to wear on the trail, then I simply drape it over my knapsack. Now I am not saying that this method is comfortable, or that it keeps me warm all night. I am simply saying that I can manage to live this way in the bush. I do not expect to be as comfortable as I would be in my bed at home, I am resigned to the fact that this simply is the way it is if I want to carry less weight and less bulk.
The same applies to my bed, which is simply made of sticks. If there is no snow on the ground, then I may collect some dead bracken to lay upon my bed of sticks. This method keeps me up off the cold ground, and allows any flowing water from rain to flow under me and out again. I store dry kindling inside my shelter just in case my fire should go out in the night, and I build up a good supply of firewood at the side of my shelter nearest my head so I can stoke the fire in the night without leaving my blanket. The close fire also allows me to cook food and boil water for hot drinks in rain or snow without having to leave my shelter and get wet.
Take care.

Keith.

4 comments:

Gorges Smythe said...

Sounds like a good system.

docfire said...

Hey Keith, I just bought Backwoodsman and got home before I realized you had a article in it! Congrats Keith!


From the North,

--Shanon

Keith H. Burgess said...

Thanks Shanon.
Regards, Keith.

Bronwyn Williams said...

Hi Keith
I don't think I would survive without a fire close by at night ,I feel the cold terribly.
Though if to be in this environment I would have to toughen up and deal with it.
Your photos are really good and you provide very useful information.Thank you for sharing .
Bron.