A LIVING HISTORY BLOG.

18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Thursday, 15 December 2016

Identification Please. Hole in muzzle-loader gun stock.

Scott contacted me asking what the hole in the stock was used for or what is its purpose. I was unable to help, so I thought one of you may have the answer or an educated guess.




4 comments:

Gorges Smythe said...

From the wear on the top escutcheon, it appears that whatever was there had four "vanes."

Keith H. Burgess said...

I had put that down to a design, but you could be right Gorges!
Keith.

Dex said...

Feather for touch hole

Scott Hitchcock said...

Keith, thank you for posting this question for me. I just received the following information from a contemporary gun maker:

"You are correct in that the hole was intended to hold a feather. The feather was used to stick into the touch-hole of the barrel in rainy weather to prevent water from fouling the charge. It was typically just a friction fit in the hole on the lower side of the buttstock. Since the feature is tapered, it tightened as it was pushed in. I hope this helps.

I've seen this a lot on original rifles. I've even owned a few with this feature. Keep in mind that this is not a full length feather like you would get from a hawk, goose, etc. The plume is usually just a few inches long a just lays over if it brushes against something."

I also found a photo that depicts the use here:

http://contemporarymakers.blogspot.com/2008/03/jack-duprey-soddy-daisy-gun.html

Regards,
Scott