A LIVING HISTORY BLOG.

18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Wednesday, 26 October 2016

18th Century Home Weaving Looms.

Colonial Weaving Loom.

1750 loom on exihibit at the Hurley (NY) Historical Society.

18th Century Loom.

This is a 1702 ad Blanket Loom. Note the difference in width of this blanket loom in comparison with normal colonial home looms.

More Information On The Woolen Industry Here: 

Center Seam Blankets.

Disturbed family life in the nursery by Johann Eleazar Zeissig (1737–1806)


I recently had an enquirie regarding center seam blankets. I could not recall any previous information I had collected, so I went searching.
Center seam blankets did exist in the 18th century. To my mind the only reason theses blankets can exist, must be because they were made on home looms that were too narrow to produce a full width blanket. This assumption of mine is backed up by at least one center seam blanket that I found that is obviously home made.
Keith.



18TH C WOOL BLANKET WITH MUSTARD COLOUR EMBROIDERY INITIALS AND CENTER SEAM.

18TH CENTURY BLUE CHECKERED WOOL BLANKET W CENTER SEAM GREAT CONDITION WELL MADE.

American Textile History Museum, Lowell, Massachusetts.


18TH CENTURY WOOL HOMESPUN TWO PIECE CREAM COLOR BLANKET 60X72 1700S.

More Information: https://rjohnhowe.wordpress.com/2014/05/16/american-frontier-weaving-in-the-17th-and-18th-centuries-janice-hensley/

"A Parcel of Strouds, Duffields, Blankets, Silver Trinkets and other suitable Articles for that Trade."

I would have liked to have seen some documentation to back up the information in this article, however, for what it is worth, here is the site. Perhaps you can take this information to use as research & document it yourself.
Keith.






Saturday, 22 October 2016

Soft Bound Leather Cover Books.

A soft bound leather cover book is a book with a leather cover that is flexible, it has no boards to make the cover stiff.
(My thanks to Mr William Pace for introducing me to the term "soft bound")
Keith.


Unknown Dutch Master. Title: Still-Life with Books. Date circa 1628.

Jan Lievens - Still Life with Books. Created: 1 January 1630

Jan Vermeulen (Haarlem 1638 - Haarlem 1674), Still Life of Books and Musical.

Saint Paul, c. 1624-1625. Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Kingston.

Still-Life-with-Books-1625-1630-ZZ-Jan-Davidsz-de-Heem.

Antonio_de_Pereda_y_Salgado_-_The_Knight's_Dream_(detail) 1650




Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Monday, 17 October 2016

Early Waistcoats & Other Clothing. Some Thoughts.

Generally speaking, fashion wise, early period waistcoats were longer than later period waistcoats. But judging the period by clothing style is not always that easy. There was for instance a second hand clothing trade, so earlier clothing styles could be worn in a later period. Then there is the possibility that a person may purchase an item of clothing that doe not fit him or her properly and, there is always the matter of personal choice. A person in a later period may not be concerned with fashion, & may prefer a longer waistcoat.
But let us go back to this earlier period of longer waistcoats, the late 17th century and early 18th century. Take a look at the painting below By Artist Jean-Antoine Watteau 1720-21. Take note of the man standing to the far left outside of the shop & compare his waistcoat to those waistcoats inside the shop.

"The Shop Sign of Gersaint", (1720-21)[1] is a painting by Jean-Antoine Watteau.
Type  Oil on canvas
Dimensions         163 cm × 308 cm (64 in × 121 in)
Location     Charlottenburg Palace, Berli; 

Rag fair Rosemary Lane By Thomas Rowlandson late 18th century.
Paul Sandby, Old Clothes to Sell, 1759.



Saturday, 15 October 2016

SALT PORK, SHIP’S BISCUIT, AND BURGOO: SEA PROVISIONS FOR COMMON SAILORS AND PIRATES, PART 1.

Sailors or Pirates loading provisions onto boat for transport to a ship. From an illustration of Blackbeard in Charles Johnson’s, “A General History of the Lives and Adventures of the Most Famous Highwaymen, Murderers, Street-Robbers, &c.,” illustrated by Joseph Nichols, 1736.

SALT PORK, SHIP’S BISCUIT, AND BURGOO: SEA PROVISIONS FOR COMMON SAILORS AND PIRATES, PART 1.

Sailors or Pirates loading provisions onto boat for transport to a ship. From an illustration of Blackbeard in Charles Johnson’s, “A General History of the Lives and Adventures of the Most Famous Highwaymen, Murderers, Street-Robbers, &c.,” illustrated by Joseph Nichols, 1736.

PDF. Reproducing The 18th Century English Biscuit.



Friday, 14 October 2016

School of the Ranger Event.


The 2017 School of the Ranger focus is "The 18th C Reconnoitering Party." The weekend event will involve a mix of lecture, hands-on, and simulated patrolling exercises designed to familiarize the participants with the skills necessary to understand all facets of the historic military specialization, as well as lend insight to future research and portrayals. Lodging in the fort, firewood and meals will be included. Registration is $60.00 and will be limited to the first 30 paid applicants.

The SOR is being co-sponsored by Jaeger's Battalion of Rogers' Rangers and the Friends of Fort Frederick. All proceeds benefit the Friends of Fort Frederick. For more information email 2017SOR@oaksedge.net or visit our website: www.rogersrangers.com

Scavenger Crew Careening Encampment.

The Crew of the Scavenger is hosting a living history encampment on an island, just South of Marco Island, on Florida's West coast, this coming January 13th through 16th. It is basically a pirate shore camp, or careening camp, taking place in the year 1717.
This is the first of what we hope will be a yearly event. There are no spectators, this is purely for reenactors and living history folks. All kits must be historically based, from the clothes you wear to the camp you set up. We have a set of authenticity guidelines, and are trying to avoid hollywood tropes at all costs.
We will be boating out to the island. Though we will be loosely concentrated on the southern tip, everyone will be selecting their own campsite. There are no facilities, no water, no food, and no entertainment provided. You must haul in whatever supplies you need, including a mandatory 5 gallons of water.Modern medications, and toiletries, must stay hidden from sight. Try to avoid bringing other modernities.
Not trying to scare anyone off, but I don't want to provide a false impression of what this encampment will be like. It will be rough, but therein lies the fun.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/317058805321355/

Tuesday, 11 October 2016

Ramrods.

The ramrod seems to be the most forgotten part of an 18th century gun when it comes to looking for information. One would think that such an important tool would receive more attention. I have noted over the years that all ramrods, original antique & modern, are always too short to be of any practicle use. When I came to make a new ramrod for my fusil, I made it out of steel & I made it longer than the barrel. Secured in the ramrod pipes under the barrel it sticks out beyond the muzzle, but with a round ball it makes no difference to the accuracy.
This is the other end of my fusil's ramrod, the end which fits through the ramrod pipes. I forged a worm on the end for cleaning the barrel.

This is the screw tip to my fusil's steel ramrod. When removed, I can screw on a "screw" tip for pulling a load.

As you can see in this image, the ramrod I made extends beyond the muzzle. This gives me a little more rod to hold when loading.

The new wooden ramrod I made for my pistol has an antler tip.

The only information available for these ramrods is that they are English.

The only information available for these ramrods is that they are English.


Ramrod or cleaning rod screw ends. No dates or any other information available.

Ramrod or cleaning rod worm ends. No dates or any other information available.

Flintlock blunderbuss by GE Kope Wangen, circa 1750. 
As you can see on this example the ramrod does not reach beyond the muzzle.


The first (top) ramrod is flared and is from a Double Barrel 12 Gauge Side by Side Percussion Shotgun made by SCOTT & Co. LONDON in the 1830's. The second ramrod has a brass tip and is from a Single Barrel 12 Gauge Percussion Shotgun having the Black Powder Belgium Liege Proof Mark of the 1830's.
As you can see in this image of my fusil, & the .32 caliber rifle below, the ramrods extend beyond the muzzle.




More information on ramrods & loading rods here: http://www.cablesfarm.co.uk/ramrods-and-loading-rods/#more-1442