A LIVING HISTORY BLOG.

18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Thursday, 30 July 2015

More On Dried Corn. Reply to a follower.

"How do you know when you're corn is done drying? What should it look like when it is done, and how long should it take? I am new to drying corn".

Depending on the drying process you use, & the amount of heat used, it can take anywhere from 15-20 minutes in or over a fire, to two weeks or more hanging. When the corn is dry, it is noticeably smaller, shriveled, & much harder to the touch. If it is dried on the cob, it will come away from the cob with very little effort.




Corn hung by the gathered husk on a line in the author's home near their heater.



The same corn dried on the cob.

Dried corn removed from the cob.





Friday, 24 July 2015

Equipment Update. A New Old Fire Steel.

One would think that with a bloke of my age & all the years I have been a woodsman, that there would not be any improvements to make to my gear. Then along comes something a little better than I have been using, & you realise that there are still improvements to be made.
Well I guess when you think about it, that is exactly as it was in the 18th century.
Another woodsman friend sent me an original fire steel, so I have swapped this original for the reproduction one I have been using for many years, & now carry the reproduction steel as a spare in the bottom of my knapsack. This original steel is about twice the size of my reproduction steel.
Keith.




Wednesday, 22 July 2015

Thursday, 16 July 2015

Reconstructed Eastern Woodland Indian Wigwam. Winter Scene.

This is the reconstructed woodland Indian wigwam that I built in our forest. You can see the drying rack to the right, & the outside fireplace with tripod just in front.