A LIVING HISTORY BLOG.

18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Sunday, 23 December 2007

Statement of group's aims.

NECLHG Statement of Aims.
We, the New England Colonial Living History Group are dedicated to the study of the New World frontier lifestyle by means of literary research and experimental archaeology. We are living historians, historical trekkers, and experimental archaeologists, studying and emulating to the best of our ability the period of 1700-1760. This also involves some research into the late 17th century.
As is the purpose of an archaeologist, to establish facts about people in a particular time period, we establish facts and an understanding of the people and their lifestyle in the early to mid 18th century. This is accomplished through experimentation in various historical situations, often in a wilderness setting, by using clothing, arms and equipment that was used between 1680 and1760 on the New World frontier to accomplish historical tasks and everyday living activities that involve period living skills and primitive wilderness survival skills.

We are not historical re-enactors involved in public displays; we practice our skills and experimental archaeology in the privacy of Wychwood Forest. We do however encourage the public to approach us for historical information, and we welcome enquiries for membership. The following is a list of interests that are in some way linked to our activities:
Daniel Boone lifestyle/ mountain men /woodsmen/ woodswomen/ woodsrunner/ Indians/ woodland Indians/ woods-women/ 18th century living history/ 18th century hunting/ camping skills/ historical trekking/ wilderness survival/ longhunters/ Scouts/ 18th century militia/ survival skills/ primitive skills/ archery/ muzzle-loading/ period fishing/ primitive shelter construction/ primitive fire lighting/ flint and steel fire lighting/ fire-bow fire lighting/ reading glass fire lighting/ spinning and loom weaving/ finger weaving/ moccasin construction/ wild plant identification/ tinder plants/ tinder preparation/ tomahawk throwing/ muzzleloader/flintlock/Davy Crocket/ Mrs Pentry/ Ann Bailey/ Huntress of the Lake/ traps and trapping/ 18th century militia/ 18th century research/ butcher knives/ hunting knife/ clasp knife/ Siamese knife/ fascine knife/ musket/ fusil/ scouting/ moccasins/ leggings/ sashes/ rabbit stick/ log cabin/ wigwam/ 18th century trail foods/ trekking/ gunpowder/ Black Powder/ cannon/ flintlock pistol/ water canteen/ water bottle/ Costrel/ tinned iron canteen/ copper canteen/ copper kettle/ 18th century cooking kettle/ brass kettle/ Knapsack/ Snapsack/ Haversack/ Market Wallet/ Shot Pouch/ powder horn/ Simon Kenton/ Tah’ca Inyanka/ Running Deer/ Le Loup/ Gris Loup/ on the trail/ Pine Tree Shilling/ Axe/ Tomahawk/ Hatchet/ woodsrunning/ Fort Henry/ New England Colonial Living History Group/ Wychwood Forest/ Forester/ 18th century military/ Rangers/ Australian Living History Federation/ Woods Lore/ Long Term Wilderness Survival/ !8th century clothing/ 18th century equipment/ 17th century equipment/ 18th century accoutrements/ 18th century woman/ Backwoodsman/ Colonial Frontier/ Frontiersman/ 18th century living skills/ Early 18th century/ Late 17th century/ !8th century historical winter trekking/ Winter camping/ Bush walking/ Wild edible plant identification/ Log cabin building/ The three sisters/ Last of the Mohicans/ Moll Flanders/ Robinson Crusoe/ Deerslayer/ Backwoodsman skills/ Colonial frontier skills/ The early fur trade/ Wychwood Forest live museum/ 18th century living history forum/ Early 18th century historical trekking forum/ historicaltrekker@gmail.com Keith H. Burgess Esq/ French and Indian War/ King Georges War/ Woodland Indian Lifestyle/

Friday, 14 December 2007

Who we are and what we do.

Who we are and what we do.
We, the New England Colonial Living History Group are dedicated to the study of the New World frontier lifestyle by means of literary research and experimental archaeology. We are living historians and historical trekkers, which means we are also experimental archaeologists studying and emulating to the best of our ability the period of 1700-1760. This also involves some research into the late 17th century.
As is the purpose of an archaeologist, to establish facts about people in a particular time period, we establish facts and an understanding of the people and their lifestyle in the early to mid 18th century. This is accomplished through experimentation in various historical situations, often in a wilderness setting, by using clothing, arms and equipment that was in use between 1680 and 1760 on the New World frontier to accomplish historical tasks and everyday living activities that involve period living skills and primitive wilderness survival skills.

We are not historical re-enactors involved in public displays, we practice our skills and experimental archaeology in the privacy of Wychwood Forest. We do however encourage the public to approach us for historical information, and we welcome enquiries for membership. The following is a list of interests that are in some way linked to our activities:

Daniel Boone lifestyle/ mountain men /woodsmen/ woodswomen/ woodsrunner/ Indians/ woodland Indians/ woods-women/ 18th century living history/ 18th century hunting/ camping skills/ historical trekking/ wilderness survival/ longhunters/ Scouts/ 18th century militia/ survival skills/ primitive skills/ archery/ muzzle-loading/ period fishing/ primitive shelter construction/ primitive fire lighting/ flint and steel fire lighting/ fire-bow fire lighting/ reading glass fire lighting/ spinning and loom weaving/ finger weaving/ moccasin construction/ wild plant identification/ tinder plants/ tinder preparation/ tomahawk throwing/ muzzleloader/flintlock

Thursday, 13 December 2007

You are very welcome Running Deer/Tah'ca Inyanka.The method you describe was/is I believe a modern invention, that works best with charred cloth. Remember, there was no "char" or "charcloth". I can find no evidence that common people used charred cloth as tinder much before the 19th century. Tinder was soaked in potasium nitrate (saltpeter). and sold in the city streets by hawkers and it was available in drug stores. In wilderness situations of course this method of preparing tinder was not available, unless one wished to use urine. I have tried both without any satisfying results, but charring works very well. Often it seems musket flints were used. In trade lists of striker supply, no mention of flint shards is shown, only musket flints. Of course using agate or quartz or similar was probably common, one used what was at hand. It is easier to use the method you mention if you have a larger enough piece of stone. Really when you think of there being no use of charred cloth, except in an emergency where tinder was not available, it is not an easy method to use with firm tinder. Also the tinderbox made things easier, and conserved tinder. There was at that time really no need to invent a different method of striking sparks onto tinder.

Supplement to Primitive Fire Lighting-Flint and Steel. Read Mace. Also known in Australia as Broad-leaved Cumbungi, and Bulrush.· Piptoporus Cretaceus. Other similar bracket fungi: Laetiporus portentosus; Fomes fomentarius; Piptoporus betulinus. The Laetiporus looks very similar to the Piptoporus, and at one time was called by that name.· More information at: www.anbg.gov.au/fungi/aboriginal.html I hope you and the family have a good xmas. My very best wishes and most sincere regards, Keith/Le Loup.

More on period kettles !

10-3-08 After further research I have not been able to document any small straight sided copper or brass kettles as sold by many traders. The only one that appears to be authentic for the period 1700-1760, is the sloping sided brass French Trade kettle style as sold by Crazy Crow Trading Co. I have recently purchased one of these kettles, and is appears to be good quality at a reasonable price.

Sunday, 2 December 2007

18th century kettle

The 18th century kettle has sloping sides and is not the "corn boiler" type commonly sold. A close copy of an 18th century kettle can be purchased from Crazy Crow Trading Post, PO Box 847, POTTSBORO, TX 75076 USA. English Trade Kettle. Code: 5564-006-000 Cost: $45 us.
One tinsmith suggests that the straight sided kettles were/are late 18th century-19th century.
I am still trying to find accurate information on kettles and canteens. The kettle from Crazy Crow Traders is as far as I can tell from my research so far, a correct type for early to mid 18th century.